Sheriff Apple: 5-year-old Kenneth White's death is considered a homicide

Sheriff Apple: 5-year-old Kenneth White's death is considered a homicide

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Take a Break: Abandoned Chinese boys at home in Capital Region

Updated: Friday, August 2 2013, 10:18 PM EDT

Two baby boys born with defects, discarded on the side the road.  In the U.S. it would have been big news and the parents would have been found and prosecuted. In some parts of the world, however, it's an almost daily occurrence.  In this 'Take a Break" report, Jerry Gretzinger introduces us to those 2 little boys, and the Capital Region family that gave them a home.

At first glance, there seems to be nothing out of the ordinary about seeing 8 year old Kyle and 3 year old Marek Desjadon enjoying themselves at the local playground.

What you can't see though is the journey they took to get here.

Both boys were born in China: Kyle with a heart defect and Marek with something called amniotic banding syndrome.

"He was born with one hand that was fused in a fist," says Leslie Desjadon.

She and her husband Michael adopted both boys back in November. Leslie says Kyle's and Marek's lives had he same rough start countless other boys have in China.

"Both kids were just abandoned most likely to their special needs.  They're alotted one child and if that one child isnt perfect, they often just leave them."

Kyle had been left on a bridge.  Merrick on a street corner.  Both remained in orphanages or with foster parents until the Desjadons brought them home.

Jerry asked Kyle, "Do you like your new family?"

"Yes," came the response.  "Happy, happy," Kyle continued.

There was another bump for Kyle. Turns out his foster family in China failed to tell him he was being adopted.  He thought he was just on vacation.

"After his first day of school, his teacher came to us and said 'I think we have a problem here,'" explains Leslie.  "The translator had figured out what was going on and we had to sit him down and tell him, that's not the case."

There was some initial shock nut Leslie says Kyle rallied around.

Today, though still far from fluent in English, his personality shines through.

"My dad and mom give me cereal.  I don't like cereal," he says with a smile.

Despite the rough start Kyle and Marek got in China, the Dejasdons want the kids to grow up appreciating their heritage.

When producers of the Shen Yun stage show, a celebration of Chinese culture coming to Proctor's Theater, got wind of the boys story, they didn't hesitate to provide the family with tickets.

Leslie says Kyle will just love the show.

"He will be over the moon."

Leslie Desjadon is a photographer and editor at CBS6.

Take a Break: Abandoned Chinese boys at home in Capital Region


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